Quite a Coincidence, part 3
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January 25th, 2012

Quite a Coincidence, part 3


Discussion (7)¬

  1. SJG says:

    Okay, I love this strip, but I find this baffling and would like more info. Really? There is a large segment of the adult population who doesn't have any form of state-issued ID? All right, so they don't drive, possess credit cards or bank accounts, or purchase alcohol, and have never done those things. That happens. But how do/did they work or pick up social security benefits or pick up a package held for them at the post office or ANYTHING? This doesn't sound like a very common thing to me. I'd like to hear more.

  2. SJG says:

    Wait. Without bank accounts, how have they ever cashed a check? That really doesn't seem possible. What am I missing here?

    • Darrin Bell says:

      They go to a check cashing store or endorse it to someone who has a checking account.

    • Joe Mama says:

      What's astonishing is that some states' Reptile governments have successfully disenfranchised 15% of their voting populations on the pretext of eliminating "voter fraud," of which their have been about ten cases nationwide, since GW made it the number one priority of US Attorneys. Including Ann Coulter.

  3. Cyril MacKie says:

    A brain?

  4. ChayaFradle says:

    Google it. You'll find at least 2 sites. http://www.aclu.org/voting-rights/oppose-voter-id… and http://www.brennancenter.org/page/-/d/download_fi… It is baffling to me as well, but it must be so!B)

  5. SJG says:

    Thanks for replying to my comment–I'm really glad I came back and checked! This is fascinating, and troubling. I sort of feel that the best solution here is not to stop requiring photo ID for voting (also it does seem that that is solving a very ~small~ problem) but to make state-issued ID more accessible to everyone, so that they aren't navigating a myriad of unpleasant social barriers. It's still another way, apparently, in which being poor costs a person a ~lot~ of time.

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